2021 NAIOP New Mexico Excellence Awards Winners


Full results from the 2021 NAIOP New Mexico Awards of Excellence program.

The following are the recipients of the Eagle Awards as part of the 2021 NAIOP New Mexico Awards of Excellence.

Community Civic / Public, 100,000 square feet and more

The Jicarilla Apache Wellness Center in Dulce, New Mexico. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

Jicarilla Apache Wellness Center

Owner: Jicarilla Apache Nation

General contractor : Flintco Construction

Architect: FBT Architects

Engineers: Bohannan Huston Inc., Bridgers & Paxton Consulting Engineers, Walla Engineering

The 100,000 square foot facility includes four major community functions: a natatorium with a six-lane competition pool, recreation and therapy pools; a gymnasium with a full-size basketball court, two full-size side courts, volleyball courts and an upper-level running track; an eight-lane bowling alley with a youth center; and a multipurpose event center. The project was carried out on budget and without a single change order.

Community Civic / Public, 17,000 square feet and less (Also)

The Laguna Community Health Center was designed to create a one-stop-shop for patients from all villages in Laguna. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

Laguna Community Health Center

Owner: 4Points HC Laguna, LLC

Developer: Laguna Health Corp.

General contractor : Bradbury Stamm Construction Inc.

Architect: Hartman + Majewski Design Group

Engineers: Hartman + Majewski Design Group; EEA consulting engineers; RME ABQ Structural Engineers, LLC, EEA Consulting Engineers

The 15,150 square foot community health center was designed to create a one-stop-shop for patients from all villages in Laguna. Flow was designed to allow after-hours use of a community hall adjacent to the lobby and a mourning room with a separate secure entrance and restroom for family members observing Pueblo traditions. Overall construction was completed in eight months, despite delays in labor and materials.

Community Civic / Public, 17,000 square feet and less (Also)

The seat of the national wildlife refuge Valle de Oro and the visitor center in the southern valley. (Courtesy of Brycon, Formative and Weddle Gilmore)

Headquarters of the Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge and Visitor Center

Owner: United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Developer: United States Fish and Wildlife Service

General contractor : CF Padilla-Brycon Joint Venture

Architect: PC with formative architecture (file architect); Weddle Gilmore, Black Rock Studio (consulting architect)

Engineers: High Mesa Consulting Group, Bridgers & Paxton Consulting Engineers, RME ABQ Structural Engineers

The project program included a new visitor center, staff administration, visitor toilet, environmental education room and maintenance building with site upgrades to include parking, shaded amphitheater, area wet built, a pedestrian bridge and walking trails. The LEED Silver project focused on sustainability. Design features include rainwater harvesting, bird-friendly building design, building and site lighting with dark skies, recycled and salvaged building materials, native landscaping, operable windows, shaded outdoor gathering areas and environmental education exhibits.

Education

The Johnson Center at the University of New Mexico, originally built in 1957, has been updated and modernized to meet the athletic and recreational needs of schools today. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

Expansion and renovation of the UNM Johnson center

Owner: University of New Mexico

General contractor : Jaynes Corp.

Architect: FBT Architects

Engineers: Bohannan Huston, Bridgers & Paxton Consulting Engineers, Walla Engineering

The project updated a 230,000 square foot building that was originally constructed in 1957 and ill-suited to UNM’s current athletic and recreational needs. The old building had seen many additions, which created an often confusing maze of hallways for visitors. The project unified previously separated areas, among other updates.

Hospitality

Sandia Resort Casino has undergone a major addition to its hotel structure and casino level structure. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

Extension / Renovation of the hotel south of the Sandia Resort & Casino

Owner / Developer: Sandia Pueblo

General contractor : Jaynes Corp.

Architect: Studio Sud-Ouest Architects

Engineers: High Mesa Consulting Group, Bridgers & Paxton Consulting Engineers, Chavez-Grieves Consulting Engineers

The addition to the hotel structure and casino level structure of Sandia Resort & Casino included: top level games, high limit games, VIP bar / restaurant, deli, and level corridor connecting the hotel and casino; and third level sports bar / casino games, kitchen and balcony / balcony bar. The 14 month project adopted the existing pueblo architectural style and was completed on budget.

Industrial

Color-changing LED lighting adds a dynamic nighttime element to the new Highlands Bridge over Central in Albuquerque. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

Highland Pedestrian Bridge

Owner: Urban Hospitality NM, LLC

Developer: Titan Development / Maestas Development Group

General contractor : Jaynes Corp.

Architect: Dekker / Perich / Sabatini

Engineers: Bohannan Huston Inc., KDC Mechanical, Service Electric Company, Chavez-Grieves Consulting Engineers

The gently curved 3,500 square foot Highlands Bridge spans Central to connect the second floor of SpringHill Suites to the Presbyterian Hospital. The hotel offers 20 dedicated rooms for use by the Ronald McDonald House Charities of New Mexico. The bridge’s glass facade, visible from Interstate 25, allows its expressive structure to be seen during the day, while color-changing LED lighting adds a dynamic element at night.

Medical

The Lincoln County Medical Center Replacement Hospital aimed to create a facility with a focus on patient-centered care. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

Lincoln County Medical Center Replacement Hospital

Owner: Lincoln County

General contractor : Jaynes Corp.

Architect: Dekker / Perich / Sabatini

Engineers: Scott M. McGee, LLC; Bridgers & Paxton Consulting Engineers; Dekker / Perich / Sabatini

The two-story, 70,000-square-foot Lincoln County Medical Center Replacement Hospital is the latest step in a blueprint for the facility that began in 2008 that determined the facility had need major updates due to outdated utilities and spaces. The hospital has 25 approved beds for labor and delivery, medicine / surgery and intensive care units; three operating theaters; and emergency, imaging, cardio / pulmonary, perfusion, laboratory, pharmacy and dietetic services. The existing hospital was demolished to allow parking.

Mixed use / multifamily (linked)

The Broadstone Highlands North development consists of a four-story main building and four surrounding transport buildings. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

Broadstone Highlands North

Owner: Broadstone Highlands North LLC

Developer: Titan Development / Maestas Development Group

General contractor : Residential Builders Alliance

Architect: ORB Architecture, LLC

Engineers: Bohannan Huston Inc.

Broadstone Highlands North in Albuquerque is a 92-unit, above-ground, multi-family urban project with a four-story main building and four surrounding transportation buildings. Units offer studios, one- and two-bedroom floor plans, and amenities include a pool, fitness center, and clubhouse area. Broadstone Highlands North is the second project to be completed at The Highlands, a mixed-use urban concept for living, working and playing on 12 acres previously considered devastated by the city.

Mixed use / multifamily (linked)

The Palacio Azul project involved the deep remodeling of six units on a site in the historic district of Santa Fes, as well as the addition of a seventh unit. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

Palacio Azul Condominium Remodel – seven units

Owner / Developer / Architect / General contractor: Zydeco 66

Engineers: ABQ Engineering, Inc .; High-tech engineering; DeLapp Engineering

The Palacio Azul is a 1.23 acre property located in the historic district of Santa Fe. The site had six residential units in various states of disrepair, including the Ashley Pond Residence, designed by local architect John Gaw Meem and listed in the historical register. The project extensively remodeled the existing units and added a seventh unit, among other changes. The units are arranged around brick zocalos, echoing traditional village planning. The architectural embodiment of the place repeats a model language found on multiple scales in the historic Santa Fe district, which includes public plazas and courtyards, walled streets, and portals.

Office

McKee Wallwork Co’s new corporate headquarters is part of Glorieta Station, an eight-acre redevelopment project in downtown Albuquerque. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

McKee Wallwork + Co Tenant Improvement

Owner: Ed Garcia

Developer / General contractor: General contractor AIC

Architect: Commercial

Engineers: BG Construction work; Tarleton Engineering Inc .; Dekker / Perich / Sabatini

McKee Wallwork + Co’s new head office is part of Glorieta Station, an eight-acre redevelopment project in downtown Albuquerque. McKee Wallwork + Co is the first tenant of the renovated property, located in a former warehouse of the historic Glorieta Brewing Company. The office design showcases the building’s concrete floors and existing wooden columns, trusses and ceilings, while new plywood cabinets, wire mesh railings, and glass showcases along the enclosed private offices. and meeting spaces reinforce the industrial nature of the space. Designed to express the creative nature of the tenant’s work, the space offers formal and informal collaborative spaces.

Retail

Burque Bakehouse, on the corner of Broadway and Hazeldine, is located in a former Dairy Queen building that has been completely renovated. (Courtesy of NAIOP New Mexico)

Burque bakery

Owner / Developer: Sarah Ciccotello and Chris McQuary

General contractor : Construction overview

Architect: Doug Heller, Sandy Johnson

Engineers: Mark Goodwin and associates; Feight Engineering; Hughes Design Co.

Bakehouse office is located on the corner of Broadway and Hazeldine in a former Dairy Queen building. When Sarah Ciccotello and Chris McQuary bought the building, it had been unsuccessful or unoccupied for years. The duo redeveloped the space to house Burque Bakehouse, where chef baker Ciccotello creates small batch bakery products with French influence. The project overcame significant infrastructure issues, including a collapsed main sewer line, inadequate original electrical service, and an unexpected required replating process.


Comments are closed.