Cabaret – NKFAN http://nkfan.net/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:21:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nkfan.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Cabaret – NKFAN http://nkfan.net/ 32 32 Feature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude – Day Twenty-Three https://nkfan.net/feature-30-days-of-cabaret-gratitude-day-twenty-three/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:14:38 +0000 https://nkfan.net/feature-30-days-of-cabaret-gratitude-day-twenty-three/ Christine Andreas – The Singer What we see in nightclubs around the world is a patchwork of genres that make up the cabaret and concert industry. There are influences from the worlds of jazz and blues, there are musical comedy shows, drag and burlesque acts, comic books, magicians, storytellers, poets, crooners and a list that […]]]>

Christine Andreas – The Singer

What we see in nightclubs around the world is a patchwork of genres that make up the cabaret and concert industry. There are influences from the worlds of jazz and blues, there are musical comedy shows, drag and burlesque acts, comic books, magicians, storytellers, poets, crooners and a list that goes on. stretch again and again. One of the biggest influences of the art form is the performing styles that came out of European countries during the first half of the last century. Consider the fascination people have with Kabarett performers from Germany and Chanteuses from France – the contribution of these two periods to European live entertainment has been invaluable to the cabaret world.

No one knows that better than Christine Andreas.

Christine Andreas approaches her club acts from a place that is one hundred percent her. No outside influences guide the Tony Award nominee as she puts together a new act: the only driving force behind Christine’s storytelling journey is her own artistic vision – and everything Christine Andreas does is done with an artistic vision. From the theme of a show to the curation of the material, from the exploration in the research and subtext of each lyric to the visceral performances in which Christine commands the stage and fills the room with the palpable energy of a woman. who is committed to Deep within, every moment of a Christine Andreas performance is intelligent, intellectual, emotional and powerful. With her crystal clear voice, her cool patrician beauty and her delicious degree of debauchery, Christine Andreas takes her audience on a journey of the purest adventures that satisfies, nourishes and intoxicates. It is a Piaf of today.

In fact, Piaf suits Christine, as La Môme was one of Ms. Andreas’ most successful artistic associations. With a live show and a CD under her belt, Christine Andreas took to the film set, creating a DVD version of PIAF – NO REGRETS, alongside her beloved husband and musical director, Martin Silvestri, and directed by his daughter-in-law Emilie Silvestri. It’s a family creation, which is one of the reasons the film is as good as it is. You see, in addition to being one of the great performers of the cabaret scene, Christine Andreas is a big family girl. She is devoted to her son, Mac (who can often be seen at her shows, as hearing his mother sing is one of her all-time favorite things), and the working relationship she shares with Martin is a true partnership on every level, always producing impressive quality control and immaculate artistry that resonates with both their vibes, not to mention the joy to be gained from observing their chemistry and devotion during their time on stage together.

Christine Andreas is an artist who does not know how to do half. She only knows how to go straight into history, straight into art, and come out triumphant, every time, with a full bloom in hand, to the great benefit of those in the front seat who were lucky and the intelligence of getting a ticket.

Read Broadway World Cabaret’s review of a Christine Andreas show HERE.

Christine is joined in her photos by the loves of her life, her son, Mac, and her husband, Martin Silvestri.

Christine’s online presence is as follows:

Website: Click HERE.

Instagram: Click HERE.

Facebook: Click HERE.

Twitter: click HERE.

Christine’s pronouns are Ms, Mrs…..me…..

Christine’s future projects include:

– I have to write a new show for NYC… I think…

– Christmas album in preparation….I ALWAYS wanted to make one…..

– NYC concert version of Marty’s “Fields of Ambrosia” …… our dream revisited … FINALLY!

Photos by Stephen Mosher; visit Stephen Mosher’s website HERE.

Feature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude - Day Twenty-Three - The Singer

Feature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude - Day Twenty-Three - The Singer

Feature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude - Day Twenty-Three - The Singer

Feature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude - Day Twenty-Three - The Singer

Feature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude - Day Twenty-Three - The SingerFeature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude - Day Twenty-Three - The Singer


Join the BroadwayWorld Team

Are you a cabaret enthusiast in New York? We are looking for people like you to share your thoughts and ideas with our readers. Members of the BroadwayWorld team have access to shows to review, conduct interviews with artists, and meet and network with other theatergoers and arts workers.

Interested? Learn more here.


Debra Messing and John Turturro to Star in PLAYING ON AIR's 10th Anniversary Celebra Photo

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By this author – Stephen Mosher

Stephen Mosher is the author of The Sweater Book (a collection of his photographs featuring famous artists from the New York, Los Angeles and London entertainment communities), Lived In Cra… (read more about this author)

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THE AMERICAN SONGBOOK ASSOCIATION AND CABARET SCENES CELEBRATES FRANK DAIN Will Play Chelsea Table + StageTHE AMERICAN SONGBOOK ASSOCIATION AND CABARET SCENES CELEBRATES FRANK DAIN Will Play Chelsea Table + Stage
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After twenty years as editor-in-chief of Cabaret Scenes Magazine, Frank Dain is honored with a one-night-only concert featuring some of the biggest artists in the industry.


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Broadway World Cabaret looks at the work of a woman we call THE DRAMA QUEEN.


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The Ultimate Phantom of the Opera Bucket List https://nkfan.net/the-ultimate-phantom-of-the-opera-bucket-list/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:15:13 +0000 https://nkfan.net/the-ultimate-phantom-of-the-opera-bucket-list/ As The Phantom of the OperaWith Broadway’s time coming to an end, it has once again become one of the city’s most popular tickets, with patrons flocking to the Majestic Theater to see Hal Prince’s iconic original production one last time. For Phantom megafans — or “Phans” — the next two months can be all […]]]>

As The Phantom of the OperaWith Broadway’s time coming to an end, it has once again become one of the city’s most popular tickets, with patrons flocking to the Majestic Theater to see Hal Prince’s iconic original production one last time. For Phantom megafans — or “Phans” — the next two months can be all about crossing off any show-related bucket list items they have left.

If you wanted to do yours Phantom bucket list, we’ve compiled this list of common items to tick off your agenda when you rewatch the show. Before February 18, of course. Because that’s when the phantom of the opera disappears once and for all…right?


The chandelier in action
(© Joan Marcus)

1. Sit under the chandelier
This one is a bucket list item not only for phans, but for the general public as well. If anyone saw Phantom a dozen times or never before, it’s safe to say that everyone wants to experience the thrill of the chandelier rising and falling just above them at least once. Tip: The best seats to sit directly under the chandelier are the central orchestra, rows A to H.

2. Sit in a box seat
Although it is debated whether the Majestic Theater actually has its own “Box 5”, given that the box seats are labeled alphabetically, seated in any box is sure to be an immersive experience. Not to mention, you get a great view of the chandelier!

Emilie Kouatchou, John Riddle and the cast of The Phantom of the Opera during “Masquerade”
(© Matthew Murphy)

3. See both Main Christine and Alternate Christine
Since its opening in 1988 on Broadway, The Phantom of the Opera always chose an alternative actress to portray the role of Christine twice a week, due to the demands of the role. Currently, alternate Julia Udine performs on Monday evenings and Saturday mornings, and main regular Emilie Kouatchou continues for the rest of the week’s performances. Bonus points if you managed to catch a reserve Christine (the current reserve on Broadway is Kanisha Marie Feliciano).

4. See a Phantom– a themed concert or a cabaret
Whether it’s New York’s 54 Below or Birdland, or your local nightlife spot, you’d be surprised how often there might be a Phantom– theme aligned for a performance. In the past, 54 Below presented “The Four Phantoms in Concert”, featuring the previous Phantom actors, and the venue also recently hosted Phantom Hugh Panaro for a solo cabaret. Keep an eye out for upcoming events at cabaret clubs and concert halls near you, because you never know who might be dropping by.

Phantom goodies on display at the Broadway Flea Market
(© David Gordon)

5. Search Phantom trinkets and treasures at the annual Broadway Flea Market
The Phantom of the Opera usually has its own table in front of the Majestic Theater… but even if in the coming years there won’t be a specific table dedicated to toes, prop letters and chandelier pieces, you’re bound to find signature products from Broadway. oldest musical. In years past, accessories like Christine’s wedding veil to custom hoodies previously given to cast members have been brought home by phans, and we don’t expect that to change.

6. Host a home viewing party of the 25th anniversary concert film and Australian film production of the sequel, Love never dies pro shot
Don’t shoot the messenger! We know Love never dies is controversial among phans, but you can’t deny that it’s super fun to watch with friends. If you try to bring one of your non-phan friends into Phantom, the 25th anniversary production starring Ramin Karimloo and Sierra Boggess is off to a good start. Then, for ages 21 and up, whip up a drinking game to watch Love never dies after.

The The Phantom of the Opera chandelier sitting on stage at the Majestic Theater
(© Joan Marcus)

7. Take a picture with the chandelier in sight
Everywhere you see Phantom, it is likely that at intermission, the chandelier – which has just crashed – will sit on stage for a few minutes until the intermission begins. See if you can run to the front of the orchestra to take a photo with him to cherish forever, then watch him ascend to the ceiling.

8. Take a picture outside the theater with the marquee in view in your best Phantom-themed outfit
It’s hard to believe that in just four months the iconic mask will be removed from the marquee of the Majestic Theatre. Be sure to take a picture with it while you still can.

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STANDARD TIME WITH MICHAEL FEINSTEIN at Carnegie Hall is as good as it gets https://nkfan.net/standard-time-with-michael-feinstein-at-carnegie-hall-is-as-good-as-it-gets/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 17:17:57 +0000 https://nkfan.net/standard-time-with-michael-feinstein-at-carnegie-hall-is-as-good-as-it-gets/ It’s easy to forget that Michael Feinstein is a great artist. It’s easy to forget because he does so many other things that come to mind. His work as a musicologist documenting, rescuing, restoring and preserving the catalog of The Great American Songbook has been impressive, all these years, so that comes to mind. His […]]]>

It’s easy to forget that Michael Feinstein is a great artist. It’s easy to forget because he does so many other things that come to mind. His work as a musicologist documenting, rescuing, restoring and preserving the catalog of The Great American Songbook has been impressive, all these years, so that comes to mind. His presence as an impresario at nightclubs bearing his name across the country is something he is known for. His stature as a world-class musician immediately comes to mind when someone hears his name. All of these things and more, Michael Feinstein does, and does it well. It is therefore easy to forget that he is a great artist.

Until he’s in front of you, on a stage, entertaining you…that’s when you find yourself shaking your head, holding your breath and thinking about how Michael Feinstein is a great artist. In fact, Michael Feinstein is as good a concert performer as anyone who has come before him, worked alongside him, or will come after him, and that includes Frank Sinatra, the subject of Mr. Feinstein’s program at Carnegie Hall, a concert aptly titled ULTIMATE SINATRA title.

Review: STANDARD TIME WITH MICHAEL FEINSTEIN at Carnegie Hall is as good as it gets

For ninety absolutely sublime minutes on Wednesday night, Michael Feinstein filled Zankel Hall with musical excellence through a carefully curated presentation of some of Frank Sinatra’s most timeless hits, some of his most enduring performances. .. but not like a myna, for Michael Feinstein has his own style. And Michael Feinstein has Tedd Firth. Thus, the arrangements have been handled in such a way as to allow Mr. Feinstein to maintain the heritage, the tradition, of Sinatra, but also to infuse his own interpretations into the famous compositions. Naturally, when an artist is dealing with someone to whom fans have dedicated their devotion, it can be a delicate balancing act, knowing when to stray from the already adored path and when to push the envelope. Music historian with wisdom and artist with instincts, Michael Feinstein and his band (with Firth on piano, David Finck on bass and Mark McLean on drums, each sensational…as a band, the living end) n made no wrong move with his musical presentation. Performing songs like ‘The One I Love Belongs To Someone Else’, ‘The Lady Is A Tramp’ and ‘I Focus On You’, Mr. Feinstein demonstrated what made him stand out , as a singer, all those years – an enviable ability with rhythm and nuance, a knowledge of when to swing and when to act, and vocal prowess that continues to amaze, to this day.

Review: STANDARD TIME WITH MICHAEL FEINSTEIN at Carnegie Hall is as good as it getsThe power ratings are more than impressive: they are perfect. The breath control is more than indisputable: it is unfathomable. And the action moments are spectacular. There’s this thing, this Michael Feinstein thing, that’s been around for many years that no one else has done, and there’s even a question in this writer’s mind whether anyone else could even do it. There is this place of tenderness that Mr. Feinstein goes to during certain stories that are almost impossible to describe in terms of vocal technique, but which (for years) has created a visual in the mind of this writer . Imagine, if you will, that Michael Feinstein’s throat is the trunk of a tree, and that there is, inside this trunk, a hole where there is a bird’s nest. In this bird’s nest is the smallest, sweetest, most delicate of winged creatures, singing softly and softly in the twilight. This is Michael Feinstein at his most introspective and poignant performances. And, then, BAM – he hits you with a Sinatra big band number and fills the air of the arena with one of those big, mind-blowing notes, and you find yourself wondering where it all came from, how he does, and how it looks so easy. It is truly a marvel to behold.

Review: STANDARD TIME WITH MICHAEL FEINSTEIN at Carnegie Hall is as good as it getsAdd to all that the fact that Michael Feinstein is funny. He’s so smart, he knows the history of music so well, the composers, Mr. Sinatra, and he discusses it with you like he’s telling a story around the dining table. There are no notes. There is no misstep. There are no long lectures. There are only pleasant and informative stories…and jokes…and impressions (yes, impressions). Feinstein is funny, and he’s funny, and he’s jovial, and he jokes. He’s everything you could want in an evening of entertainment, and he’s more because he takes a few chances to sit down at the piano and play while singing (a rare lyric applied to the heartbreaking “Where Do You Start” relieved the composition of all sorrows, finally), and he so obviously appreciates the artistry of his fellow musicians, who are simply the best a person could ever hope to be with on stage. The solos were insane, especially from Mr. Firth, who is a treasure to the industry, and no mistake.

Review: STANDARD TIME WITH MICHAEL FEINSTEIN at Carnegie Hall is as good as it gets

Wednesday night’s Feinstein/Sinatra/Carnegie concert is one of the finest evenings this writer has had this season because, a fan of Feinstein since the 80s, his catalogue, his canon, his work, have become like threads in the fabric of my life. His music has become like muscle fibers that are there, doing the work, supporting daily activities, but not really taken advantage of, to the point of taking them for granted. And while I thoroughly enjoyed Michael’s tribute show to Judy Garland last December, that night of Sinatra songs reignited in this longtime fan a renewed devotion to the man, a reinvigorated interest in his work, and I can definitely say that I won’t miss a unique Michael Feinstein show in the future. He is simply magnificent, simply the best, and his version of “One For My Baby” has been at the top of my list of favorites for the past two days… ahead of Mr. Sinatra’s. In a night of outstanding performances like a superb “I’ll Be Around”, and a lush “The Second Time Around” and an epic “Frank Sinatra Medley”, this was a real highlight, and all thanks to Michael Feinstein, one of the real great artists.

Find the great shows and concerts to see on the Carnegie Hall website HERE.

THIS is Michael Feinstein’s website.

Fadi Kheir’s photos courtesy of Carnegie Hall

Review: STANDARD TIME WITH MICHAEL FEINSTEIN at Carnegie Hall is as good as it gets

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‘War & Peace’ becomes a stunning cabaret show in Berkeley https://nkfan.net/war-peace-becomes-a-stunning-cabaret-show-in-berkeley/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 18:01:15 +0000 https://nkfan.net/war-peace-becomes-a-stunning-cabaret-show-in-berkeley/ A section of Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy’s famously long and complicated masterpiece ‘War and Peace’ might seem like an unlikely source for a Broadway musical, but ‘Natasha, Peter and the Great Comet of 1812’ doesn’t. is no ordinary Broadway musical. It’s an “electropop opera” sung by composer Dave Malloy, a former Bay Area resident. And […]]]>

A section of Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy’s famously long and complicated masterpiece ‘War and Peace’ might seem like an unlikely source for a Broadway musical, but ‘Natasha, Peter and the Great Comet of 1812’ doesn’t. is no ordinary Broadway musical.

It’s an “electropop opera” sung by composer Dave Malloy, a former Bay Area resident. And as seen in the current production of Shotgun Players at Berkeley, it’s awesome.

Local audiences may already be familiar with Malloy’s dynamic and often humorous oeuvre in a dizzying and eclectic mix of styles. Shotgun created his dazzling “Beowulf – A Thousand Years of Baggage” and Rasputin’s musical “Beardo”. His sublime “Octet” recently came to Berkeley Rep, and “Ghost Quartet” played the Curran a few years ago. And before all that, he was creating inventive new works in spaces ranging from the EXIT Theater to the Willard Middle School Metal Shop.

‘The Great Comet’ gave Malloy his 2016 Broadway debut in an acclaimed production nominated for 12 Tony Awards, including best musical, book, score and orchestrations – and those are just those of Malloy himself. It’s been a long wait for the Bay Area to get a chance to see it, and it seems fitting that Shotgun is the theater to do so.

The show is largely about the young and naive Countess Natalya Ilyinichna Rostova, nicknamed Natasha, seduced by the rake Anatole as she waits for her fiancé Andrey to return from the war against Napoleon’s invading army. The other titular character, Pierre, is a depressed, poorly married man, adrift in his own life.

Co-directors Patrick Dooley (Artistic Director of Shotgun) and Erin Mei-Ling Stuart give the show a luminous staging that literally transforms the Shotgun space.

Nina Ball’s set transforms the theater into an elegant cabaret nightclub with a long runway-style stage with some of the audience seated right next to it and other spectators below like in opera boxes. This elegance is reflected in Jasmine Milan Williams’ costume design, full of colorful dresses and lots of fur coats.

Dooley and Stuart’s staging makes excellent use of space, making the whole experience immersive. Stuart’s lively choreography accentuates the action with courtly dance bits and occasional kick lines.

Part of the seven-piece band led by musical director and pianist Daniel Alley sits in a small circular pit in the center of the stage, while others play on either side of the stage.

Eleven actors play a broad cast of characters, humorously cataloged with short descriptors in a boisterous early ensemble number.

Albert Hodge (who starred in Shotgun’s recent production of “Passing Strange”) exudes ardent grief as the mild-mannered, unhappily married Stone, who remains largely withdrawn from the action as he does from the life. He and Natasha don’t actually interact until almost 2.5 hours into the show, very close to the end.

Jacqueline Dennis is a sweet dreamer as Natasha, dazed by the attention she attracts and touchingly tormented as things inevitably go awry. Veronica Renner is extremely empathetic as Natasha’s concerned friend Sonya, especially when she accompanies herself on acoustic guitar over a beautiful folk-style lament. Michelle Ianiro is a grounded and optimistic presence as Marya, their host as they await the return of their fiancés.

A flirtatious pair of flirtatious siblings struggle to write about themselves. One is Angel Adedokun’s slinking, eyeing Helen, with serpentine movements and a soulful solo number. The other is his brother, Nick Rodrigues as the manipulative and smiling Anatole, a heartless womanizer affecting the ardor of gentlemen.

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Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE to 54 below https://nkfan.net/amy-jo-jackson-raises-the-bar-with-the-brass-menagerie-to-54-below/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 18:04:26 +0000 https://nkfan.net/amy-jo-jackson-raises-the-bar-with-the-brass-menagerie-to-54-below/ “We’ve had this date from the start.” That was me, as the 54 Below announcer kicked off THE BRASS MENAGERIE, Amy Jo Jackson’s award-winning cabaret piece that has taken Manhattan by storm in recent years. This most original and compelling play was first reviewed by Broadway World Cabaret in 2020 (read Bobby Patrick’s article HERE) […]]]>

“We’ve had this date from the start.” That was me, as the 54 Below announcer kicked off THE BRASS MENAGERIE, Amy Jo Jackson’s award-winning cabaret piece that has taken Manhattan by storm in recent years. This most original and compelling play was first reviewed by Broadway World Cabaret in 2020 (read Bobby Patrick’s article HERE) and the only reason Bobby got the sweet gig is because this Tennessee Williams devotee wasn’t free to leave, but as I edited the article, I cringed in jealousy. As more and more cabaret-goers attended shows for which I was unavailable, reports continued to circulate about the quality of the show. Then the Bistro Awards committee gave the show an award for excellence in the art form of cabaret, and it turned out that I was the only person in New York who hadn’t seen the groundbreaking performance.

This time is no more.

It’s always exciting to see an artist unlike any other, because originality is the only commodity each of us has in life. This is especially true in the arts, especially in the performing arts. The world reveres the original. But when a person who is an original takes that unique quality that is most authentically themselves and uses it to create something completely different, it is a sign of greatness. Amy Jo Jackson, as seen in a variety of group shows in any given cabaret season, is an original, but their musical cabaret THE BRASS MENAGERIE is that rare thing artists dream of creating: novelty. Like Picasso or Chanel, Munro or Mozart revolutionized the fields in which they created, Jackson created something completely new and uniquely his own. Combining their passion for legitimate theatre, their dedication to the music scene, their obsession with a playwright and their dedication to the art form of cabaret, Amy Jo Jackson has developed a program that explores all plays and (mostly) heroines by Tennessee Williams. , through only its dialogue, the compositions of (mostly) musical theater composers, and all the magic inside their wonderland of a mind. And what’s left for the audience is one jaw-dropping, jaw-dropping, jaw-dropping gay moment after another.

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Alongside musical director Brian Nash (who is truly one of the best in the business, as this Olympic cabaret event demonstrates), Jackson acts as emcee, instructor and actor, delivering a veritable tour de force. – indeed, it’s the kind of performance for which the term Tour-de-Force was coined. There are segments of THE BRASS MENAGERIE focusing on Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (it’s more than brilliant), Sweet Bird of Youth (very creative), The Rose Tattoo (hilarious), Suddenly Last Summer (blistering) and The Glass Menagerie (epic), all of which evoke the tragedy of Tennessee, employing copious amounts of jaw-dropping comedy, as well as terrific voice acting, using the works of Andrew Lloyd Webber, Ahrens & Flaherty, Stephen Sondheim and other Broadway legends, though going into detail would require a major spoiler alert for future audiences, and that wouldn’t be fair. Indeed, future patrons of The Brass Menagerie would be strongly advised not to do any research, to read no further than this article, which will remain spoiler-free until the end. Playing Amy Jo Jackson’s ingenious parody in real time will ensure the authenticity of the laughter created from the outside and enjoyed from the inside. And before anyone realizes that Tennessee Williams and Stephen Sondheim are buying one person eighty minutes of camping, let this writer assure everyone that YES, there’s a lot of camp on this show (that’s sort of integrated, de rigueur, if you will)… but it’s also incredibly touching at times. The Streetcar Named Desire segment is utterly gorgeous and charming (and for those familiar with the history of The Great American Songbook, a delivery on an expected promise, walking through the door), and this writer’s personal favorite all evening was a devastating presentation based on Summer and Smoke. Although some audience members began Alma’s monologue from the play that later became Eccentricities of a Nightingale with cackles of laughter, the laughter gave way to sentimental sniffles and wondering silence.

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Even with all the ardor felt in every moment of the play (magnificently directed by Andrew Neisler), and even with the explorations of Blanche Dubois and Alma Winemiller resounding with the greatest ardor in this heart, nothing prepared this writer at the end of BRASS MENAGERIE, which, if there is justice in the world, will never land on YouTube. This moment alone is worth the trip and the price of the ticket. This number alone is worth all the awards and accolades. This performance alone is worth raising your hand, pointing and saying, “This woman is special. This piece is ingenious. This experience is what a quality cabaret can be, in the hands of an artist.

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Dear reader, take my advice and don’t wait too long like I did. Upgrade your Tennessee Williams and head to the next performance of THE BRASS MENAGERIE and find out what it’s all about. Trust me when I say you can always count on the kindness of Amy Jo Jackson to give you a truly unforgettable evening.

Find great shows to see on the 54 Below website HERE.

THIS is Amy Jo Jackson’s website.

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 belowReview: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 belowReview: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 belowReview: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 below

Review: Amy Jo Jackson raises the bar with THE BRASS MENAGERIE at 54 belowPhotos by Stephen Mosher; Visit Stephen Mosher’s website https://stephenmosher.com/ICI.


Join the BroadwayWorld Team

Are you a cabaret enthusiast in New York? We are looking for people like you to share your thoughts and ideas with our readers. Members of the BroadwayWorld team have access to shows to review, conduct interviews with artists, and meet and network with other theatergoers and arts workers.

Interested? Learn more here.


Isaac Sutton extends his concert tour with Nurit Hirsh Photo

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Robert Bannon and Alyssa Wray will join LIVE WITH RYE & FRIENDS ON BROADWAY at Tri Photo

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By this author – Stephen Mosher

Stephen Mosher is the author of The Sweater Book (a collection of his photographs featuring famous artists from the New York, Los Angeles and London entertainment communities), Lived In Cra… (read more about this author)

Feature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude - Day 9: The Parent UnitsFeature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude – Day 9: The Parent Units
November 9, 2022

Broadway World Cabaret looks at the work of a couple who are clearly THE PARENTAL UNITS


Feature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude - Day Eight: The TrailblazerFeature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude – Day Eight: The Trailblazer
November 8, 2022

Broadway World Cabaret looks at the work of a man we recognize as THE PILOT


Review: Carole J. Bufford shines bright in BAD MOON RISING at BirdlandReview: Carole J. Bufford shines bright in BAD MOON RISING at Birdland
November 7, 2022

With her show All Hallows Eve, Carole J. Bufford ignites Birdland.


Feature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude - Day Seven: The Birdland FourFeature: 30 Days of Cabaret Gratitude – Day Seven: The Birdland Four
November 7, 2022

Broadway World Cabaret looks at the work of an arts collective we call THE BIRDLAND FOUR.


10 videos to guide us until TO STEVE WITH LOVE: LIZ CALLAWAY CELEBRATES SONDHEIM plays 54 below on November 910 videos to guide us until TO STEVE WITH LOVE: LIZ CALLAWAY CELEBRATES SONDHEIM plays 54 below on November 9
November 6, 2022

One of the best shows of 2022 will return to 54 Below to celebrate a live taping.


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Diversionary Theater launches new Open Mic, Storytelling Slam night at Clark Cabaret & Bar https://nkfan.net/diversionary-theater-launches-new-open-mic-storytelling-slam-night-at-clark-cabaret-bar/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://nkfan.net/diversionary-theater-launches-new-open-mic-storytelling-slam-night-at-clark-cabaret-bar/ Regina Victor at Queer Poetry Night at the Clark Cabaret & Bar at the Diversionary Theatre. Photo credit: Peggy Ryan The Diversionary Theatre’s new cabaret space will feature an open mic night, storytelling slam and more in November. The Clark Cabaret & Bar will also offer a series of Monday events designed to support members […]]]>
LGBT Arts and Culture University Heights
Regina Victor at Queer Poetry Night at the Clark Cabaret & Bar at the Diversionary Theatre. Photo credit: Peggy Ryan

The Diversionary Theatre’s new cabaret space will feature an open mic night, storytelling slam and more in November.

The Clark Cabaret & Bar will also offer a series of Monday events designed to support members of San Diego’s theater community, as well as several one-night-only events for the month.

Coming soon to the University Heights-based space:

  • The Open Mic party starts on Thursday.
  • The San Diego Black LGBTQ Coalition is screening a documentary series about the local Black Queer and Trans experience on November 11, followed by an after party.
  • Mariam T’s Comedy Cabernet arrives November 12, featuring drag, improv and stand-up comedy with “San Diego’s craziest drag queen,” Mariam T.
  • The monthly movie night, Queer Iconic Film Series, presents “The Manifest of Mallery” on November 13 – a short documentary about the life of a trans woman navigating the complexities of growing up in the Deep South, with the film’s director, Victor Llang Alexio and Mallery join in for a Q&A after the movie.
  • The new storytelling slam, called Open Flame, begins November 19.
  • The Janice Edwards Trio returns on November 26.

Regular events at the cabaret include Live Music Wednesdays, followed by Karaoke, Funday Sunday on the second and fourth Sundays of each month, and Queer Poetry Night on the last Monday of the month.

The Clark Cabaret & Bar is a new space at the Diversionary Theater that has hosted the community six nights a week in a piano bar atmosphere since opening in fall 2021. Local favorites perform as well as emerging artists and local music companies. theater.

The bar is open Wednesday to Monday from 5:00 p.m. to closing, with happy hour every day from opening to 6:30 p.m.

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Feature: Featured: Contempt of Cabaret https://nkfan.net/feature-featured-contempt-of-cabaret/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 22:04:54 +0000 https://nkfan.net/feature-featured-contempt-of-cabaret/ Recently, I was in a nightclub (one of the biggest) to see a performance by a cabaret artist (one of the biggest), and it was a memorable evening… more than a title. Everywhere you looked there was a show business notable, a celebrity, a big name person. There were revered artists, impressive industry professionals, nominees […]]]>

Recently, I was in a nightclub (one of the biggest) to see a performance by a cabaret artist (one of the biggest), and it was a memorable evening… more than a title. Everywhere you looked there was a show business notable, a celebrity, a big name person. There were revered artists, impressive industry professionals, nominees and winners, cabaret journalists and photographers, and all with the same goal in mind: to see this singular and superb cabaret artist at work. . And we saw the artist of our idolatry at their craft; we have seen them and we have heard them.

We also heard the ladies sitting at home leaving.

There’s an epidemic in this country, and it’s not the one that locked us up for six months, it’s the one that holds us hostage for sixty to seventy moments when we go out to see a show. It’s an epidemic of etiquette, or, to be precise, a lack of etiquette. People are less well behaved in today’s world: there are notorious incidents of skirmishes on airplanes, temper tantrums in coffee shops, and bad behavior on Broadway. People in today’s society seem to have made a conscious decision to give up observing good manners, and that is a crying shame. It is also a nagging irritation.

Throughout the seventy-five minute performance given by one of the industry’s most respected entertainers, in one of the industry’s most expensive venues, a group of women seated against the club wall insisted on chatting, laughing and raising cain, so much so that the prominent (no, not prominent: important) members of the cabaret and concert community seated directly across from my table became increasingly visibly upset. In an evening that was at least seventy percent tender, quiet, heartfelt ballads, these women continued to raise their voices in not-so-private, joyous conversation, voices that could be heard clearly across the room. room. It was inadmissible, it was unbelievable, and it came from another member of the cabaret and concert community. We could all see the faces of the courtesy criminals, plain and simple. The cabaret halls are not large and the lighting casts a glow over an entire venue, and these inconsiderate people might as well have been sitting in the stands at a sporting event, their faces glued to the Jumbotron, so much their features were visible. Every person in the theater could see them, including the eminent (no, not eminent: important) person standing on the stage singing the songs. As minute by minute the chatter from the bench grew louder and louder, heads turned as grimaces were thrown at the unconscious offenders, until finally the program was over and members of the cabaret and concert community come together vexed at each other. congregations to discuss the infraction and raise the question: who will be the one to approach their colleague and verbally slap him on the wrist for his unfathomable breach of etiquette?

Whether or not someone has approached the person in question remains in between. And there is every chance that such a meeting will include apologies and surprise, even sincere explanations. People seldom care to have the mirror of self-reflection up to their mistakes and flaws. Everyone knows what happened was some inconsiderate people went to a night club, had a few drinks and showed what little respect they have for the people around them, by starting with the artist on stage and ending with those other patrons who have paid a hundred dollars to sit in a cabaret and watch an artist whose work they admire. There is no excuse good enough, no explanation reasonable enough, no excuse acceptable enough to assuage the anger of everyone else in this club who was there to witness the rudeness and see their enjoyment of the evening diminished. Excuses and explanations do not clean up this behavior. It was a program of several quiet ballads – no mere enthusiasm for a show could explain the ruckus of their response unless it was a rock concert, a Gay Pride celebration or the New year’s eve.

There is a famous saying: familiarity breeds contempt. In context, it refers to the concept that knowing a person or thing too well leads to a loss of respect. There are, however, two ways to look at these three words – familiarity breeds contempt – and this is just one of them. The Talker, being a member of the cabaret and concert community, being a member of the family (so to speak) feels empowered to behave however they choose, during a performance. After all, they will be excused for their bad behavior, right? How many times have people abused us because we are their parents? We can treat our family less than we treat a stranger because they have to forgive us – they are stuck with us. Why not apply this to the artistic environment in which we evolve? If we are members of the community, won’t our colleagues forgive us for our lack of respect? They are our artistic friends and family – why not treat them with the familiarity with which we treat our loved ones? Why not treat them with contempt? The answer is simple: because now they will despise us. And there’s contempt for the Gossips who ruined the show for some audience members who couldn’t drown out the gibberish, and those are people who know the face and name of the offending party. The familiarity of this concert party has led other prominent (no, not prominent: important) members of the community to feel a well-deserved contempt for them – and, from experience, this is a pattern of behavior that this author has witnessed no less than four other shows that involved this same person talking and texting from his table, throughout the performance.

So what should a person do? When you’re sitting in a nightclub and faced with the difficulty of hearing the artist sing into a microphone above an audience member who doesn’t even have the benefit of an amplification system, but who surpasses the interpreter, what to do? Are we silently waiting and wishing for a waiter to speak to the manager to intervene? Do we stand still, while being dragged out of the costly experience by our frustration and outrage, while remaining silent? Do we draw the noisemaker’s attention to his offense, ourselves, somehow? Do we confront and run the risk of uproar?

I remember a story I heard on the last Clint Holmes show, a tribute to Peter Allen called BETWEEN THE MOON AND NEW YORK CITY. In it, Mr. Holmes describes the origin of a famous composition written by the prolific songwriter. Mr Allen was in a nightclub watching Julie Wilson perform and a nearby talkers table was getting louder and louder, so he took out a pen and scribbled on a napkin, “Quiet Please, There’s a Lady Onstage,” and thus was born a song that became as famous for its existence as it was for being dedicated to his late stepmother, Judy Garland. There was a Lady on stage that night, and another member of her own community displayed, throughout, a ride more befitting a Monster Truck Rally than a nightclub. That won’t be enough. It was pure, old-fashioned, garden-variety rudeness, inconsiderate behavior by the performer on stage, the art form presented, and the audience who paid to be there. And it’s a shame because this behavior is going to scar her and her own personal industry, because you can bet the day after the performance (perhaps on the trip home after the performance), these important members of the community cabaret and concert were telling their friends and colleagues everything, and they were telling the story with names, and with a certain contempt.

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BAY AREA CABARET PRESENTS MEOW MEOW at the Venetian Room https://nkfan.net/bay-area-cabaret-presents-meow-meow-at-the-venetian-room/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 22:12:17 +0000 https://nkfan.net/bay-area-cabaret-presents-meow-meow-at-the-venetian-room/ Bay Area Cabaret opens its 22-23 season with a rare lineup choice – post-modern diva Meow Meow, the alter ego of Melissa Madden Grey. Unusual in this modern cabaret Meow Meow which chooses a 20th century Weimar style that challenges and provokes the public. It’s not a show tunes and Great American Songbook party and […]]]>

Bay Area Cabaret opens its 22-23 season with a rare lineup choice – post-modern diva Meow Meow, the alter ego of Melissa Madden Grey. Unusual in this modern cabaret Meow Meow which chooses a 20th century Weimar style that challenges and provokes the public. It’s not a show tunes and Great American Songbook party and not everyone’s palate for sure. Behind the comedic facade and burlesque slapstick is a thoughtful and talented singer who lets the music do the talking.

She plays on her unique appearance, looking like a windswept Joan Collins. Strutting onstage like the diva that she is, Meow quietly mentioned, “That’s a lot, I know.” When no one threw flowers at her feet, she stopped the show to offer her own adoration. She plays with lighting technology, providing her own lineups, often to mask that he’s taking a sip of straight-out-of-the-bottle wine or chewing on hard candy. When she can’t shock the stage, the stagehands present her with a turntable and spin her through a beautiful cover of Radiohead’s “Fake Plastic Trees.”

She’s a natural comedian who’s endearing to audiences, but she really shines when she sinks into her wildly eclectic material. Since her days with Pink Martini, she has offered “I Lost Myself (I’m Hungry…and that ain’t right) written by composer/collaborator Thomas Lauderdale as well as a co-written “Hotel Amour” from from his CD of the same title.His riveting and emotive delivery.

Kurt Weil and Bertolt Brecht are portrayed by “Pirate Jenny” from threepenny opera, performed boldly entirely in German. Same with 1929’s “Surabaya Johnny”, performed rather than just sung, understanding the context of the material. Another German cabaret song, “Alles Schwindel (It’s All a Swindle)” may have pushed the boundary of non-English presentations. To complete his tribute to European song, a beautiful interpretation of “Sans toi (Without You)”, music by Michel Legrand and words by Agnès Yarda interpreted in French.

Accompanying Meow Meow was Emmy-winning pianist/composer/singer and musical director Lance Horne, who has worked with a host of super talented performance artists such as; Rufus Wainwright, Vivian Bond and Taylor Mac. Its light and lyrical touch is a perfect counterpoint to Meow’s material. Closing the show was a haunting rendition of Patti Griffin’s “Kite Song,” a call to overcome grief and sadness and weather life’s storms. A poignant and beautiful finish, the unique personality it’s Meow Meow.

The next step for Bay Area Cabaret is Broadway world“Vocalist of the Year” and winner of the Mabel Mercer Foundation Award Carole J. Bufford on November 20. Tickets available at https://cloud.broadwayworld.com/rec/ticketclick.cfm?fromlink=2206597®id=18&articlelink=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bayareacabaret.org%2F?utm_source=BWW2022&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=article&utm_content=bottombuybutton1 or by calling (415)927-4636.

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Cabaret, Christmas and Place of Commemoration at the Cowichan Performing Arts Center in November – Cowichan Valley Citizen https://nkfan.net/cabaret-christmas-and-place-of-commemoration-at-the-cowichan-performing-arts-center-in-november-cowichan-valley-citizen/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://nkfan.net/cabaret-christmas-and-place-of-commemoration-at-the-cowichan-performing-arts-center-in-november-cowichan-valley-citizen/ November at the Cowichan Performing Arts Center kicks off with three intimate cabaret shows, where the audience sits on the stage with the performers. The first is Qairo on Tuesday, November 1 at 7:30 p.m. Qairo combines music and dance, presented by an ensemble of seven who blended their traditions from France, Spain, Canada and […]]]>

November at the Cowichan Performing Arts Center kicks off with three intimate cabaret shows, where the audience sits on the stage with the performers.

The first is Qairo on Tuesday, November 1 at 7:30 p.m.

Qairo combines music and dance, presented by an ensemble of seven who blended their traditions from France, Spain, Canada and Turkey into a unique blend.

“Qairo is a fiery and dynamic ensemble that combines the emotionally charged voices and thrilling rhythms of flamenco dance with the infectious melodies and punchy tones of the Mediterranean diaspora,” describes a press release for the show.

“From Spain to Turkey to India (with stops along the way), Qairo is music to dance to, no matter where you’re from. These are Turkish micro-tones played on an Indian bansuri flute, original flamenco verses “sung” by a clarinet, Balkan rhythms punctuated by an Andalusian guitar and flamenco footwork hammered like improvised jazz. Qairo is guitar, oud, clarinet, bansuri, saxophone, cajon, electric bass, cante (flamenco song) and baile (flamenco dance) acting as if they belong together on stage – and succeeding.

Tickets are $40 and due to the cabaret format they are limited, so don’t wait if you want to see the show.

•••

The following night, November 2, also at 7:30 p.m., John Reischman and The Jaybirds.

It’s billed as “an elegant take on bluegrass” that blends original songs and instrumentals with old-time Appalachian music.

The Jaybirds have been together for 20 years and have released seven albums and earned two Juno Award nominations.

Tickets are $40.

•••

On November 3, Raine Hamilton takes the stage at 7:30 p.m.

Hamilton is a singer-songwriter whose music is for violin and voice as well as guitar and voice.

“Raine is both a singer of the prairies and a weaver of stories; every song has a story, delivered between the songs with humor and grace,” reads a press release from the show.

Joining Hamilton for the show are musicians on cello and double bass.

The trio calls the resulting music “chamber folk”.

Tickets are $40.

•••

A new art exhibit debuts in the theater lobby titled Conscious Contact – Staying in Touch in November.

Barry Strasbourg-Thompson and Gail Holland will exhibit their work.

Admission to the Lobby Gallery is free. Private viewings can be arranged by calling Laura at 250-746-3428.

•••

Opera fans will want to book tickets for November 12 when the Met Opera presents and recalls Medeapresented at CPAC on the big screen.

Medea tells the story of a “mythical witch who stops at nothing in her quest for revenge”. The star is soprano Sondra Radvanovsky. She is accompanied by tenor Matthew Polenzani, soprano Janai Brugger, bass Michele Pertusi and mezzo-soprano Ekaterina Gubanova.

The show starts at 9:55 a.m. Tickets are $35 or $32 for seniors. Students in grades 8-12 enter for $5.

•••

That night, get ready for something completely different.

At 7:30 p.m. it is The Journeymen: Tribute to Eric Clapton and Carlos Santana.

“Nothing is more central to rock mythology than the cult of the lead guitarist. No one has done more to create this cult than Eric Clapton and Carlos Santana. “The Journeymen” is a tribute to two of the most important guitarists in history,” reads a press release for the show.

Clapton has been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame three times and has won 18 Grammy Awards.

Santana has sold over 100 million albums and is the best-selling Latin artist of all time.

Tickets are $45.

•••

The public is invited to Relive The Music: 50s & 60s Rock ‘n Roll on Friday, November 18 at 7:30 p.m.

Billed as back by popular demand with even more fun, the show is a rock opera concert “with a Broadway feel” featuring a band, singers, dancers, tributes, video and trivia.

“Millennials buy tickets to this show for your parents and grandparents. They will have a blast with memories,” a press release read.

The repertoire includes hits from Roy Orbison, Johnny Cash, Frank Sinatra, Doris Day, Patti Page, Dean Martin, Fats Domino, Little Richard, Led Zeppelin, Elvis, Patsy Cline, The Beatles and more.

Tickets are $59.

•••

On November 20 at 7:30 p.m., it’s time to get into the Christmas spirit with a Cowichan Valley favorite: Natalie MacMaster and Donnell Leahy present A Celtic Family Christmas.

MacMaster and Leahy are beloved Canadian cultural icons with their spirited fiddles. In this show, they bring their talented children with them as they present a heartwarming evening of Christmas classics and Cape Breton folk music.

Tickets are $49.50.

•••

Then on November 27 at 2 p.m., it’s Crete.

“Often referred to as the ‘battle that made Canada’, Vimy Ridge claimed over 10,000 Canadian casualties. Through direct storytelling, theater and live music from Brenden McLeod and The Fugitives, Crete examines the misconceptions and varied perspectives surrounding the battle, while drawing parallels with other formative events in our country’s past,” reads a press release for the show.

It includes renditions of songs by soldiers from the First World War and delves into the question of how and why we mourn.

Tickets are $38, or $34 for seniors, with an additional $25 discount for veterans. Students in grades 8-12 enter for $5.

•••

To close the month, the film Reel Alternatives Phantom of the Open.

It tells the story of a dreamer who advances to the qualifying round of the 1976 British Open Golf Championship despite being a complete novice.

The Reel Alternatives film series is a fundraiser for Cowichan Hospice.

Tickets are $17.

Get tickets for CPAC shows at cowichanpac.ca or call 250-746-2722.

Arts and cultureArts and entertainment

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Concert Review: ‘Judy’ by the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, DC https://nkfan.net/concert-review-judy-by-the-gay-mens-chorus-of-washington-dc/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 18:45:46 +0000 https://nkfan.net/concert-review-judy-by-the-gay-mens-chorus-of-washington-dc/ Jarrod Bennett sings “Over the Rainbow” in JUDY. Photo by Michael Key. Judy Garland may have left us to cross the rainbow, but her star has never faded. The Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, DC (GMCW) exemplified the legend’s influence beautifully in their intimate cabaret titled “Judy,” under the artistic direction of cabaret pianist Alex […]]]>

Jarrod Bennett sings “Over the Rainbow” in JUDY. Photo by Michael Key.

Judy Garland may have left us to cross the rainbow, but her star has never faded. The Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, DC (GMCW) exemplified the legend’s influence beautifully in their intimate cabaret titled “Judy,” under the artistic direction of cabaret pianist Alex Tang.

Gay Men’s Chorus from Washington, DC beautifully illustrates how [Judy Garland’s] the influence shines on…

Featuring a small jazz trio and mostly solo performers, the choir members took the audience on a journey through their personal connections to the music of Judy Garland in short monologues before each number. Some were melancholic, some humorous, some touching, and a downright epic story of a young gay boy’s week-long dramatic sob fest to persuade his parents to buy him a coveted collection of Judy Garland LPs. (which ended in a valiant success!)

I enjoyed how each vocalist sought to find their own artistry in a thoughtful homage to a Judy classic, allowing us to both hear the standards as we know and love them while being amazed and delighted by the individuality of each performer. Chuck Willett was particularly notable on “Hello, Bluebird” with his playfulness at every reiteration of the title phrase, not to mention his outstanding eye contact and audience engagement, really giving us that cabaret flavor.

Rinaldo “Rini” Martinez also brought the flair with his bawdy take on “The Trolley Song,” paying cheeky attention to certain sound effect lyrics and enhancing their effect with corresponding gestures that gave a touch of tasteful but so fun of risk. Adam Edgerton demonstrated a truly impressive mastery of dynamic control in his rendition of “Come Rain or Come Shine”. It went from quiet to loud and back again on quick, simple notes and made it sound effortless, drawing me into a song whose melody might not otherwise have engaged. Instead, I was held on the edge of my seat by her thrilling performance.

Rob Hall gave the audience a charming and heartbreaking rendition of “Smile”, prefacing his song by recounting Judy’s struggles with depression, and one particular performance he found where she sang the song almost to herself. I really appreciated the melancholic energy he brought to his performance. Ellery Rhodes gave a powerful performance of ‘Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas’, telling us how they loved the lyrics ‘we’ll have to manage somehow’ when they were kids, and were overwhelmed to hear the prevalent sanitized version “hanging a shining star on the highest branch” takes its place in most non-Judy covers. They put their heart and soul into their voices, and it shows.

Although there were too many artists to name, all outstanding, my favorite artist of the night was definitely Jarrod Bennett with his superb rendition of “Over the Rainbow”. He stripped the performance of any pretense and sang from his heart for his sister, who he explained had passed away. Bennett gave us a gospel-influenced performance with runs that were purely emotional rather than for show. His raw pain seemed to flow straight from his heart into his voice, and he received a standing ovation from the audience. I still have goosebumps.

“Judy” was an outstanding example of GMCW’s ability to deliver intimate performances alongside grand, all-encompassing affairs. Unfortunately, it was only one night, but I strongly encourage readers to attend an upcoming GMCW performance. I’m sure you won’t leave disappointed!

Duration: 90 minutes without intermission.

“Judy” ran for one night only on October 22, 2022 presented by the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, D.C. at The Vault, Capital One Hall, 7750 Capital One Tower Road, Tysons, VA 22102. For more event information at come by GMCW under the guidance of Dr. Thea Kano, click here.

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